Vinyasa to Release Tension

img

Yoga Poses in this Sequence

Bound Angle Pose

Bound Angle Pose

Bound Angle Pose, or Baddha Konasana, is a seated asana which nurtures relaxation and serenity. It stretches the inner thighs, hips and legs. There is no twisting or turning, balancing or struggling in this pose, it is about quiet peace and contemplation. This pose is also known as Cobbler’s Pose as shoemakers in India would sit this way while working.

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose, or Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, is a standard part of many yoga routines. It’s one of those poses which is strengthening but relaxing, invigorating but serene. Your body forms the bridge here, creating an arch. You can add different variations including one leg up and clasping your hands beneath your body to make this pose more challenging.

Cat Pose

Cat Pose

Cat Pose, or Marjaryasana, is one of the most commonly recognized yoga poses. The shape of the body resembles a stretching, arching cat. This pose is usually done as a partner to Cow Pose, as Cat Pose has the back high while Cow Pose has the back low.

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose, or Balasana, is a wonderfully relaxing pose which is part of most yoga routines as a moment to pause. Child’s Pose is about releasing yourself to the world and trusting that everything will be alright. It is a moment to simply breathe. The name comes from the relaxed sleep of a contented child.

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose, or Bhujangasana, is a floor pose which gently stretches and flexes the body. Its head-up position is reminiscent of a cobra rising up off the ground. It brings flexibility and strength.

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose, or Savasana, is one of the simplest poses in the entire yoga repertoire. You simply lie on your back. But within that is a wealth of power. Interestingly, while many yoga teachers love to use Western names for most poses as they are easier to remember, many also use the Sanskrit name Savasana for this particular pose because they find the name “Corpse Pose” to be off-putting for Western audiences. The pose’s alternate name, Mrtasana, means “Death Pose” which is not much better. So Savasana it is.

Cow Pose

Cow Pose

Cow Pose, or Bitlasana, is a floor pose which is traditionally paired with Cat Pose. They are the mirrors of each other. Cow Pose shouldn’t be confused with Cow Face Pose. In Cow Face Pose, the legs and arms are all twisted together. In Cow Pose, you are simply on your hands and knees, your dangling abdomen representing the udder of a cow

Crow Pose

Crow Pose

Crow Pose, known as Kakasana, and Crane Pose, known as Bakasana, are both versions of the same balancing position. Crow Pose is the easier of the two poses, where you balance closer to your hands. Crane Pose is a more extended version. It’s good to practice and get the hang of Crow Pose first and then to move on to the trickier Crane Pose. For both of these poses, it’s important to practice balance first and to build core strength with poses like Plank Pose and Boat Pose.

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog, or Adho Mukha Svanasana, is one of the most recognizable yoga positions out there. It’s featured on countless magazine covers and yoga posters. This triangular form represents so much of what yoga has to offer. It’s accessible to most people. It brings calm and stress relief. It strengthens muscles. It builds flexibility. The pose name comes from the stretch that just about every dog lover has seen a thousand times.

Garland Pose

Garland Pose

Often referred to in class by its Sanskrit name, Malasana, Garland Pose is a deep yogic squat, where the knees and feet are wide enough to accommodate the chest and shoulders. It encourages an opening through the inner thighs, creates a grounding feeling in the feet and hips and improves dorsiflexion range in ankles

Lord of the Fishes Pose

Lord of the Fishes Pose

The Lord of the Fishes Pose, or Matsyendrasana, offers a great spinal twist while massaging the abdominal organs, improving their function. It actively lengthens the tailbone, stretches the hips and engages the muscles of the core and the back at the same time. Demanding great balance, it also brings peace to the mind and has a soothing effect on the nervous system.

Lunge Pose

Lunge Pose

The Lunge Pose, or Banarasana, is a beginner pose which allows one to focus as well as stretch the hips and multiple muscles of the legs. It stretches for instance the psoas, the quadriceps and the hamstrings, making them beautifully long and lean. Furthermore, the Lunge Pose increases one’s focus and concentration as it demands the practitioner to maintain a specific kind of balance and stay in control of one’s attention.

Plank Pose

Plank Pose

The Plank Pose is perhaps one of the most common poses outside of the yoga field. It is practiced by many people regardless of the type of sports they do. Phalakasana focuses on balancing your body using your arms. It is a great pose to tone your abdominal muscles, stretch the spine, and strengthen the arms. Plank is an essential component of Sun Salutations and is often used as a transitional pose.

Standing Split Pose

Standing Split Pose

Standing Split is a combination of a one-legged standing balance and a forward fold. Unlike front splits assisted by gravity, Standing Split is sometimes called True Split because the hip range is solely powered by your muscles.

Thread the Needle Pose

Thread the Needle Pose

Thread the Needle is a simple kneeling pose that provides relief for neck and back tension. It’s considered a variation of Child’s Pose (Balasana) with an added twist and a lift in the hips resembling Puppy Pose (Uttana Svanasana). It can be performed both as a static posture and as a dynamic flow sequence (see modifications).

Alyssa Macon

Alyssa Macon is a mom (and dog mom) in Nashville, TN who started practicing yoga in 2013. Like a lot of people, she came to yoga for the physical aspects simply wanting to stay in shape. Over time, she realized that the asana may bring us to yoga but it’s usually not what keeps us here.

After her 30th birthday, she felt like she was in a weird place…  just not herself. She knew that something needed to change so she decided to be consistent in her yoga and meditation practice. When she did, all of the other aspects of yoga showed up. She’s more content than before. She developed a kinder relationship with her mind and body. She found herself surrounded with the love and the sense of community that yo...