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Yoga Poses in this Sequence

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose, or Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, is a standard part of many yoga routines. It’s one of those poses which is strengthening but relaxing, invigorating but serene. Your body forms the bridge here, creating an arch. You can add different variations including one leg up and clasping your hands beneath your body to make this pose more challenging.

Camel Pose

Camel Pose

Camel Pose, or Ustrasana, is a floor-based backbend supported on the knees. It’s a great way for those with balance issues to work with backbends. There are a number of modifications available to help you ease into the full pose. The name comes from the shape you’re making with your body, which resembles a camel’s hump.

Cat Pose

Cat Pose

Cat Pose, or Marjaryasana, is one of the most commonly recognized yoga poses. The shape of the body resembles a stretching, arching cat. This pose is usually done as a partner to Cow Pose, as Cat Pose has the back high while Cow Pose has the back low.

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose, or Balasana, is a wonderfully relaxing pose which is part of most yoga routines as a moment to pause. Child’s Pose is about releasing yourself to the world and trusting that everything will be alright. It is a moment to simply breathe. The name comes from the relaxed sleep of a contented child.

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose, or Savasana, is one of the simplest poses in the entire yoga repertoire. You simply lie on your back. But within that is a wealth of power. Interestingly, while many yoga teachers love to use Western names for most poses as they are easier to remember, many also use the Sanskrit name Savasana for this particular pose because they find the name “Corpse Pose” to be off-putting for Western audiences. The pose’s alternate name, Mrtasana, means “Death Pose” which is not much better. So Savasana it is.

Cow Pose

Cow Pose

Cow Pose, or Bitlasana, is a floor pose which is traditionally paired with Cat Pose. They are the mirrors of each other. Cow Pose shouldn’t be confused with Cow Face Pose. In Cow Face Pose, the legs and arms are all twisted together. In Cow Pose, you are simply on your hands and knees, your dangling abdomen representing the udder of a cow

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog, or Adho Mukha Svanasana, is one of the most recognizable yoga positions out there. It’s featured on countless magazine covers and yoga posters. This triangular form represents so much of what yoga has to offer. It’s accessible to most people. It brings calm and stress relief. It strengthens muscles. It builds flexibility. The pose name comes from the stretch that just about every dog lover has seen a thousand times.

Extended Side Angle

Extended Side Angle

The Extended Side Angle Pose, or Utthita Parsvakonasana, is a position which does not only ground you and makes you more aware of your body, but it also strengthens it to its core. Being a strong activator of the Heart Chakra, the pose promotes free thinking, mindfulness and imagination. Naturally, it also gives a great stretch to the hamstrings, quadriceps, psoas as well as the upper body muscles.

Happy Baby Pose

Happy Baby Pose

The Happy Baby Pose, or Ananda Balasana is a wonderful opportunity to give your back a proper, deep massage it has always needed. It relaxes the whole body and has a positive calming effect, reducing stress and anxiety. At the same time, muscles of the main body parts are being actively stretched and engaged.

Hero Pose

Hero Pose

Hero Pose, or Virasana, is an intermediate yoga pose which focuses on improving the mobility of the knee joints as well as stretching the muscles of the thighs and the spine.

Lizard Pose

Lizard Pose

Lizard Pose, or Utthan Pristhasana, is a powerful hip opener which also happens to lengthen the leg muscles, especially the hamstrings and the quadriceps. It also tones the glutes well, staying in the leg area. When it comes to the upper body, the pose tones the core, the back and the chest, additionally building strength in the deltoid muscles. Maintaining such balance demands lots of concentration and focus hence the Lizard Pose nurtures great amounts of determination in the practitioner.

Mountain Pose

Mountain Pose

Mountain Pose, or Tadasana, is considered the foundation of all standing poses that offers multiple health benefits, including pain relief from sciatica. It is a great pose for beginners and can be used to transition into other poses. Tadasana can also be done by itself to improve posture and increase strength.

Pigeon Pose

Pigeon Pose

Eka pada rajakapotasana, also known as Pigeon Pose or one-legged Pigeon Pose, offers an enjoyable backbend that stretches and strengthens key muscle groups in the body including the back, core, hips and legs. A seated pose, Pigeon Pose has many benefits including breath work and relieving Sciatica.

Plank Pose

Plank Pose

The Plank Pose is perhaps one of the most common poses outside of the yoga field. It is practiced by many people regardless of the type of sports they do. Phalakasana focuses on balancing your body using your arms. It is a great pose to tone your abdominal muscles, stretch the spine, and strengthen the arms. Plank is an essential component of Sun Salutations and is often used as a transitional pose.

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose is a variation of a Cobra backbend. In fact, its Sanskrit name translates to Supported Cobra Pose (“Salamba-” meaning with support, “-bhujanga” meaning snake or serpent). It’s a lovely alternative to deeper Cobra variations or Upward Facing Dog Pose for those who don’t want to load their lower spine too much.

Warrior I

Warrior I

While yoga is founded in peace, the name of this pose commemorates a spiritual warrior - someone strong, brave and not stepping down in the face of adversity. Warrior I is recognised as one of the foundational poses, practiced regularly in most yoga disciplines.

Warrior II

Warrior II

Warrior II, or Virabhadrasana II, is a natural continuation in the Warrior series, and can be used in a sequence as well as practised in isolation. It involves the majority of muscle groups and requires a lot of focus to get all the pose elements right.

Elyse Jung-Vrymoed

Elyse Jung-Vrymoed is a Los Angeles based artist and teacher. She is a practitioner of the mantra “Yes, and…” 

A student of yoga to some degree since her early teens, she is a great believer in its restorative value as part of a holistic approach to mental and physical health. In her 10 year work as a teacher of young children she has sought to de-stigmatize discussions around mental health in the arts while passing on a joyful passion for the subject. As an artist, though her subjects remain thoroughly adult, they are influenced by the ridiculous and playful spirit of her students. Interested in the ever poignant human topics of sex, myth and mortality; her artwork playfully points at life’s big j...