Warrior 1 (Virabhradrasana) Flow

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Yoga Poses in this Sequence

Boat Pose

Boat Pose

Boat Pose, or Paripurna Navasana, is a great pose for building balance while drawing in your full concentration. As you hold the position, you will strengthen every part of your core. A fairly strenuous pose, beginners will need to work on their balance before moving on to deeper variations.

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose, or Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, is a standard part of many yoga routines. It’s one of those poses which is strengthening but relaxing, invigorating but serene. Your body forms the bridge here, creating an arch. You can add different variations including one leg up and clasping your hands beneath your body to make this pose more challenging.

Cat Pose

Cat Pose

Cat Pose, or Marjaryasana, is one of the most commonly recognized yoga poses. The shape of the body resembles a stretching, arching cat. This pose is usually done as a partner to Cow Pose, as Cat Pose has the back high while Cow Pose has the back low.

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose, or Balasana, is a wonderfully relaxing pose which is part of most yoga routines as a moment to pause. Child’s Pose is about releasing yourself to the world and trusting that everything will be alright. It is a moment to simply breathe. The name comes from the relaxed sleep of a contented child.

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose, or Savasana, is one of the simplest poses in the entire yoga repertoire. You simply lie on your back. But within that is a wealth of power. Interestingly, while many yoga teachers love to use Western names for most poses as they are easier to remember, many also use the Sanskrit name Savasana for this particular pose because they find the name “Corpse Pose” to be off-putting for Western audiences. The pose’s alternate name, Mrtasana, means “Death Pose” which is not much better. So Savasana it is.

Cow Pose

Cow Pose

Cow Pose, or Bitlasana, is a floor pose which is traditionally paired with Cat Pose. They are the mirrors of each other. Cow Pose shouldn’t be confused with Cow Face Pose. In Cow Face Pose, the legs and arms are all twisted together. In Cow Pose, you are simply on your hands and knees, your dangling abdomen representing the udder of a cow

Dolphin Pose

Dolphin Pose

Dolphin Pose, or Ardha Pinch Mayurasana, is a variant on Downward-Facing Dog. This classic triangle-shaped pose helps build balance, arm strength, leg strength and overall endurance. Dolphin Pose provides a modification where your torso is weighted on your elbows rather than your wrists. That makes it much easier for people who have wrist issues like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. This is called Dolphin Pose because the body shape looks like a dolphin jumping up out of the water.

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog

Downward Facing Dog, or Adho Mukha Svanasana, is one of the most recognizable yoga positions out there. It’s featured on countless magazine covers and yoga posters. This triangular form represents so much of what yoga has to offer. It’s accessible to most people. It brings calm and stress relief. It strengthens muscles. It builds flexibility. The pose name comes from the stretch that just about every dog lover has seen a thousand times.

Extended Puppy Pose

Extended Puppy Pose

The Extended Puppy Pose, or Uttana Shishosana, is a true restorative packet to the whole body as well as the mind. It provides a deep, deserved stretch to the muscles of the legs, the hips, the spine and genially opens the upper body at the same time. By doing so, it ultimately relaxes, destresses and calms the overworked mind, lowering blood pressure and facilitating healthy breathing.

Head-to-Knee Forward Bend Pose

Head-to-Knee Forward Bend Pose

Head-to-Knee Forward Bend Pose, or Janu Sirsasana, is a pose great for all of the yoga practitioners as even if it is performed only to some degree, it can be worked on while it brings the same amount of benefits. It stretches practically the entire body, starting from the neck, ending at the muscles of the shin. It increases the stability of the spine and the lower back, improving its flexibility and preventing stiffness. Last but not least, it fantastically relieves the anxiety symptoms as well as induces the feeling of inner harmony and balance.

Intense Side Stretch Pose

Intense Side Stretch Pose

Intense Side Stretch Pose, or Parsvottanasana, is a beautiful balancing, stretching as well as strengthening pose. It demands awareness and synchronized breathing from the practitioner so it also serves as a wonderful calming practice. It is great whenever one needs a deep, whole body stretch with an emphasis put on the hamstrings and the core.

Pigeon Pose

Pigeon Pose

Eka pada rajakapotasana, also known as Pigeon Pose or one-legged Pigeon Pose, offers an enjoyable backbend that stretches and strengthens key muscle groups in the body including the back, core, hips and legs. A seated pose, Pigeon Pose has many benefits including breath work and relieving Sciatica.

Plank Pose

Plank Pose

The Plank Pose is perhaps one of the most common poses outside of the yoga field. It is practiced by many people regardless of the type of sports they do. Phalakasana focuses on balancing your body using your arms. It is a great pose to tone your abdominal muscles, stretch the spine, and strengthen the arms. Plank is an essential component of Sun Salutations and is often used as a transitional pose.

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose is a variation of a Cobra backbend. In fact, its Sanskrit name translates to Supported Cobra Pose (“Salamba-” meaning with support, “-bhujanga” meaning snake or serpent). It’s a lovely alternative to deeper Cobra variations or Upward Facing Dog Pose for those who don’t want to load their lower spine too much.

Standing Split Pose

Standing Split Pose

Standing Split is a combination of a one-legged standing balance and a forward fold. Unlike front splits assisted by gravity, Standing Split is sometimes called True Split because the hip range is solely powered by your muscles.

Warrior I

Warrior I

While yoga is founded in peace, the name of this pose commemorates a spiritual warrior - someone strong, brave and not stepping down in the face of adversity. Warrior I is recognised as one of the foundational poses, practiced regularly in most yoga disciplines.

Wayne Lehrer

Wayne has been practicing Yoga for 40 years and teaching for 20 He’s studied extensively, in the U.S. and in India and personally led hundreds of people through 18 teacher trainings. He currently leads workshops and retreats in yoga, mindfulness, Authentic Happiness and Enlightened Aging in the U.S., China and India. He has developed his Authentic Happiness seminar into a high school curriculum that is currently offered to seniors to prepare them for a balanced and purposeful life. Wayne has written a book, The Prodigy Within: The Quest to Discover Your Life’s Purpose that has serves as the basis of numerous retreats and seminars and is currently being developed into an online course.

In addition Wayne ...