Morning Charge

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Yoga Poses in this Sequence

Boat Pose

Boat Pose

Boat Pose, or Paripurna Navasana, is a great pose for building balance while drawing in your full concentration. As you hold the position, you will strengthen every part of your core. A fairly strenuous pose, beginners will need to work on their balance before moving on to deeper variations.

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose, or Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, is a standard part of many yoga routines. It’s one of those poses which is strengthening but relaxing, invigorating but serene. Your body forms the bridge here, creating an arch. You can add different variations including one leg up and clasping your hands beneath your body to make this pose more challenging.

Cat Pose

Cat Pose

Cat Pose, or Marjaryasana, is one of the most commonly recognized yoga poses. The shape of the body resembles a stretching, arching cat. This pose is usually done as a partner to Cow Pose, as Cat Pose has the back high while Cow Pose has the back low.

Chair Pose

Chair Pose

Chair Pose, or Utkatasana, is a fairly challenging standing yoga pose which tests many different parts of your body at once. Chair pose requires you to balance while building strength in your entire lower half of your body. At the same time, this standing pose builds core strength by the nature of the balance position involved.

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose

Child’s Pose, or Balasana, is a wonderfully relaxing pose which is part of most yoga routines as a moment to pause. Child’s Pose is about releasing yourself to the world and trusting that everything will be alright. It is a moment to simply breathe. The name comes from the relaxed sleep of a contented child.

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose, or Bhujangasana, is a floor pose which gently stretches and flexes the body. Its head-up position is reminiscent of a cobra rising up off the ground. It brings flexibility and strength.

Cow Pose

Cow Pose

Cow Pose, or Bitlasana, is a floor pose which is traditionally paired with Cat Pose. They are the mirrors of each other. Cow Pose shouldn’t be confused with Cow Face Pose. In Cow Face Pose, the legs and arms are all twisted together. In Cow Pose, you are simply on your hands and knees, your dangling abdomen representing the udder of a cow

Crow Pose

Crow Pose

Crow Pose, known as Kakasana, and Crane Pose, known as Bakasana, are both versions of the same balancing position. Crow Pose is the easier of the two poses, where you balance closer to your hands. Crane Pose is a more extended version. It’s good to practice and get the hang of Crow Pose first and then to move on to the trickier Crane Pose. For both of these poses, it’s important to practice balance first and to build core strength with poses like Plank Pose and Boat Pose.

Eagle Pose

Eagle Pose

Eagle Pose, or Garudasana, is a standing twisting pose which tests both your flexibility and your sense of balance. It’s good to practice first with Tree Pose for standing balance as well as various seated twisting poses before combining them together in this standing challenge. The body in this pose resembles an eagle perched high on a mountaintop tree branch.

Extended Side Angle

Extended Side Angle

The Extended Side Angle Pose, or Utthita Parsvakonasana, is a position which does not only ground you and makes you more aware of your body, but it also strengthens it to its core. Being a strong activator of the Heart Chakra, the pose promotes free thinking, mindfulness and imagination. Naturally, it also gives a great stretch to the hamstrings, quadriceps, psoas as well as the upper body muscles.

Headstand Pose

Headstand Pose

Falling under the category of more advanced poses, Headstand Pose, or Sirsasana, offers many benefits. It actively engages the muscles of the core. It propagates correct posture and strength in the area. Simultaneously, it demands focus to maintain the needed balance which promotes a healthy mind.

Locust Pose

Locust Pose

Locust Pose, or Salabhasana, is a backbend of extra strengthening, stretching and mental benefits. First off, it lengthens the spine and the back, alleviating pain and tension in the area and promoting a healthier, more natural posture. At the same time, it strengthens the core as its muscles are needed to hold the balance. Improving the blood circulation in the whole body, the pose improves tissue oxygenation and hence calmness, better mood and mitigation of anxiety.

Low Lunge Pose

Low Lunge Pose

The Low Lunge Pose, or Anjaneyasana, is a backbend which positively affects practically the entire body. It opens the hips and stretches the muscles of almost every body area: the legs, the back, the core, the shoulders and the arms. It demands well-developed balance and focus hence trains one’s consciousness and awareness. Furthermore, being a Pitta and Manipura Chakra stimulant, it energizes and motivates to take action.

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose

Sphinx Pose is a variation of a Cobra backbend. In fact, its Sanskrit name translates to Supported Cobra Pose (“Salamba-” meaning with support, “-bhujanga” meaning snake or serpent). It’s a lovely alternative to deeper Cobra variations or Upward Facing Dog Pose for those who don’t want to load their lower spine too much.

Warrior II

Warrior II

Warrior II, or Virabhadrasana II, is a natural continuation in the Warrior series, and can be used in a sequence as well as practised in isolation. It involves the majority of muscle groups and requires a lot of focus to get all the pose elements right.

Bobby Rodriguez

Bobby Rodríguez came across the yoga practice over ten years ago while navigating what felt like rock bottom. After years of self medicating and disordered eating proved fruitless, the tools of the yoga practice allowed Bobby to find healing in Self excavation through movement- and later on stillness. Bobby draws largely from Ashtanga and Dharma yoga methods to assist those seeking wellness and Self Realization through yoga. He is grateful to teachers Sri Dharma Mittra, Julia Shemesh, and Gimel Everett for sharing the fruit of their knowledge. Aum Namaste.