Lunchtime Express

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Yoga Poses in this Sequence

Standing Forward Bend

Standing Forward Bend

Standing Forward Bend, or Uttanasana, is a well known yoga posture and a goal for many people who want to be able to touch their toes. It is normally used in a Sun Salutation sequence following Mountain Pose (Tadasana) at the start of the sequence and repeated again after a Vinyasa. It doesn’t have to be a transitional pose, it can be practiced as a posture in its own right, too. It’s great for relaxing the spine and neck and opening through the back of the legs at the end of your day.

Standing Half Forward Bend

Standing Half Forward Bend

This pose, otherwise known as a Half Lift, is often included in a sun salutation sequence between a Standing Forward Bend and stepping back into Plank or Chaturanga. It’s usually performed on a breath in, as a chance to lengthen through the spine while staying folded.

Low Lunge Pose

Low Lunge Pose

The Low Lunge Pose, or Anjaneyasana, is a backbend which positively affects practically the entire body. It opens the hips and stretches the muscles of almost every body area: the legs, the back, the core, the shoulders and the arms. It demands well-developed balance and focus hence trains one’s consciousness and awareness. Furthermore, being a Pitta and Manipura Chakra stimulant, it energizes and motivates to take action.

Plank Pose

Plank Pose

The Plank Pose is perhaps one of the most common poses outside of the yoga field. It is practiced by many people regardless of the type of sports they do. Phalakasana focuses on balancing your body using your arms. It is a great pose to tone your abdominal muscles, stretch the spine, and strengthen the arms. Plank is an essential component of Sun Salutations and is often used as a transitional pose.

Knees to Chest Pose

Knees to Chest Pose

Knees to Chest Pose, or Apanasana, is a beginner pose which allows the practitioner to unwind and relax, especially after a long day when the legs feel painful and heavy. The pose, while taking the weight from the legs, focuses on the abdomen and the back, strengthening their muscles and other structures.

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose

Cobra Pose, or Bhujangasana, is a floor pose which gently stretches and flexes the body. Its head-up position is reminiscent of a cobra rising up off the ground. It brings flexibility and strength.

Chair Pose

Chair Pose

Chair Pose, or Utkatasana, is a fairly challenging standing yoga pose which tests many different parts of your body at once. Chair pose requires you to balance while building strength in your entire lower half of your body. At the same time, this standing pose builds core strength by the nature of the balance position involved.

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose

Bridge Pose, or Setu Bandha Sarvangasana, is a standard part of many yoga routines. It’s one of those poses which is strengthening but relaxing, invigorating but serene. Your body forms the bridge here, creating an arch. You can add different variations including one leg up and clasping your hands beneath your body to make this pose more challenging.

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose

Corpse Pose, or Savasana, is one of the simplest poses in the entire yoga repertoire. You simply lie on your back. But within that is a wealth of power. Interestingly, while many yoga teachers love to use Western names for most poses as they are easier to remember, many also use the Sanskrit name Savasana for this particular pose because they find the name “Corpse Pose” to be off-putting for Western audiences. The pose’s alternate name, Mrtasana, means “Death Pose” which is not much better. So Savasana it is.

Bobby Rodriguez

Bobby Rodríguez came across the yoga practice over ten years ago while navigating what felt like rock bottom. After years of self medicating and disordered eating proved fruitless, the tools of the yoga practice allowed Bobby to find healing in Self excavation through movement- and later on stillness. Bobby draws largely from Ashtanga and Dharma yoga methods to assist those seeking wellness and Self Realization through yoga. He is grateful to teachers Sri Dharma Mittra, Julia Shemesh, and Gimel Everett for sharing the fruit of their knowledge. Aum Namaste.